Design is a Two-way Street

Posted 2 AugustBlog, Ideas

As a custom designer, I aim to please you — my client partner. I want my work to make you jump out of your seat, to excite you, to make you “oooooh” and “aaaaah” out loud.  And I create my best work with input from you.
 
As designers, when we hear comments like, “I’ll know it when I see it,” they strike fear in our minds. I think award-winning author Pamela Wilson, author of Big Brand System, addressed it best when she said: When we hear this, we have visions of parading design after design by reviewers who sit passively and observe. Design is a two-way process, and participation and guidance are key to coming up with a final product that meets the client’s needs.
 
Some designers might not feel that way. But I feel strongly that good design is born out of a great deal of discussion, planning, and communication with you.
 
To help facilitate the design and communication process, we use a creative blueprint at GLC. Here are some tips from the blueprint that may help you with your next design project:
 
Articulate your goals and objectives.

·      Who is your target audience (age, profession, affiliation, location, etc.)?

·      What is the primary message you wish to convey to your audience?

·      What are your expectations, primary objectives and goals (long term and short)?

Be prepared. Help us out by pointing out the work you’d like this to be on par with. Provide examples of things you like and things you dislike.

·      List some of your competitor publications, websites or collateral. 

·      State specifically what you like and dislike (color scheme, graphics, spacing, typography, layout, functionality, navigation flow, content mix, etc.)

Always remember to give a designer as much information as possible up front so they can execute the project correctly.

·      What three words do you want visitors to use when describing your organization or publication?

·      What do you feel is the biggest challenge in getting your image across to your audience?
 

What do you think? In your work, is design a two-way process?

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